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Neighbour Consultation Scheme

Changes to Permitted Development Rights

On May 30th 2019, the government permanently increased the size limits for single-storey rear extensions allowed under permitted development (planning permission application not required).

Before this date, single-storey rear extensions could not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house by more than four metres if a detached house, or more than three metres for any other house.

Now, this has doubled and single-storey rear extensions must not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house by more than eight metres if a detached house; or more than six metres for any other house.

However, larger single-storey rear extensions are subject to the Neighbour Consultation Scheme, which means you can’t just start building if your single-storey rear extension is between 4-8 metres for a detached house or 3-6 metres for any other house.

Allowed under permitted development*

*You probably don’t have permitted development rights in a conservation area, on a listed building or in an area of outstanding natural beauty. Check with your local planning authority if you’re not sure whether or not you have any planning restrictions in place.

On May 30th 2019, the government permanently increased the size limits for single-storey rear extensions allowed under permitted development.

What is the Neighbour Consultation Scheme?

If you’re planning to build a larger single-storey rear extension (between 4-8 metres for a detached house or 3-6 metres for a semi-detached/terraced house), your Local Planning Authority will need to be informed of the proposed work via a ‘Prior Approval’ application. 

The Local Authority will then consult your adjoining neighbours to advise them of your planned development. If your neighbours raise any concerns or objections, the local authority will decide if their objections are valid and whether your plans can go ahead.

This application cannot be done retrospectively and must be completed before building work begins.

How to submit a ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’ application

The ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’ application can be printed and posted to your local planning authority but it is recommended that you apply online via the Planning Portal application service.

Click ‘Start a planning application’
Step 1 – Find your address
Step 2 – Application Type: Scroll to ‘Prior approval – New development’ and select ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’
Step 3 – Confirm details

Along with the application form and fee, you’ll need to submit a written description of the proposed extension, a plan of the site showing the proposed development and any existing enlargement of the original house and the addresses of any side/front/rear properties who share a boundary.

(You don’t need to make the application yourself – Yoop can submit a ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’ application on your behalf so you don’t have to worry about it)

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FREE: Complete Guide to Planning Permission for Homeowners

Inside this easy to read free guide, we will teach you the key things you need to know about planning permission.

How much does a ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’ application cost?

The application fee for a ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’ application is £96.

You can claim an exemption to this fee if:

  • The proposal is for extensions and alterations to a disabled person’s dwelling house to improve access, safety, comfort, etc; or
  • An application for planning permission (for which a fee is payable) is being made by the same applicant on the same date for the same site, buildings or land as the prior approval application

How long does the ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’ application take?

The ‘determination period’ ends 42 days after the application is received by the local planning authority.

The local authority will send notification to each of your neighbours that you share a boundary with, giving them details of

  1. Your proposed development
  2. When your application was received and when the 42 day determination period ends
  3. How long the neighbour has to make an objection (which must be at least 21 days) and the date by which any objections need to be received

If any adjoining neighbours raise an objection, the local authority will decide if the impact of your proposed extension on your neighbours is acceptable and whether your plans can go ahead.

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When can development on a ‘Larger Home Extension’ begin?

Development can begin if:

  • The local authority sends notification in writing that:
    a) No objections were received from adjoining neighbours
    b) The local authority determined that any impacts were acceptable
  • You haven’t received notification of the local authority’s decision within the 42 day determination period

What happens if my ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’ application is refused?

If approval is refused, you/the developer can appeal the decision or modify the proposed extension until an acceptable level of impact is achieved.

Source: ‘Prior Approval: Larger Home Extension’ Guidance

For more information, go to Neighbour Consultation Scheme

 

If you have any questions about planning an extension, complying with permitted development rules and the Neighbour Consultation Scheme, or just questions about creating your dream home in general, go ahead and book a free call below with Yoop.

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